Help Your Kids Find Their Reading Niche

When getting your kids excited to read, sometimes you follow your heart, and other times you use your imagination. Think back to your favorite memory of your favorite book. What was it about those books that inspired

you pick up the next story, the next story and the next story? Something about reading made a connection with you. Getting reading connected to your kids is where the fun begins. Yes, we all started our kids with board books and colorful pictures, but when lift the flaps, musical sounds and rhyming words take charge, kids get more interested. Making the transition to readable material and chapter books begins with exploring as many books as you can and integrating them in their life. Implementing a routine dedicated to reading is where kids make time for books therefore expanding their vocabulary, enhancing their reading skills and using their imagination. 

When my children were small, we hardly ever missed storytime at the public library. It was a routine that began with books along with crafts and songs, but also ended with books. Every week, we would check out as many as books as we could carry. Some would be educational, some would be just for fun. Not only did we have storytime at bedtime, we also would take a few minutes either while waiting on dinner to cook and maybe take a book outside to sit on the backyard swing. For us, it was about enjoying books in not only the usual situations, but also making time to relax with a good story. 

Finding your reading niche is where a love for reading begins. One of my earliest memories began with Archie Comic Books and evolved into picking novels to read on numerous family car trips. My love for reading grew into voracious appetite with entire series such as The Chronicles of Narnia and all the Little House on the Prairie books. As I got older, my brother and I would pass novels back and forth constantly to each other. Going to the book store was an adventure. Wherever you get your books, it’s about letting your child find what they like. Once that happens, they’ll continue to discover even more possibilities.

Putting their reading in action is also easy to do. Have your child share their favorite story with a younger sibling or let them read to their dolls or stuffed animals. Getting engaged in different ways is how books become part of their lives and memories begin. Once they catch on, asking them to take time to read won’t be such a struggle. The key is showing them different stories, different times to read and making it a fun adventure. As published on Katy Macaroni Kids here. 

Summer reading

Summer is here, and what joy it is to have a few minutes to grab a favorite book to enjoy!

Yes, adults might think like this, but getting kids excited about reading when not in school requires a little creativity and imagination. That’s where your local library has access to some of the most incredible resources you’ll ever imagine. 

Of course, there will still be storytimes for the younger set, but keep an eye out for an extensive calendar with free events, appearances, crafts and more. 

Over the year with my four kids, we were exposed to a world of possibilities that spurred potential reading interests and topics on the things we attended. The most popular by far was about magic tricks and snakes!

We’ve handled snakes, (me included), learned about support dogs, and created take-home goodies from 3D printers. We’ve seen fascinating puppet shows, specially-designed Houston Grand Opera on the Go! Performances, and even magicians, one who proceeded to cut my daughter in half much to the horror of her younger sister! The list is literally endless of all the things we’ve able to experience. 

Another great thing about summer reading at the local libraries is often the motivational reward programs that go along with your kids’ reading progress as they track the books they’ve read. 

Kids are encouraged to learn about experiences they’ve participated in or just explore the wonders of the library from comics to chapter books and starter young adult series. Habits and events like these are where reading can thrive….even outside the classroom! As published on Katy Macaroni Kids here.